Notebooks

Retro?

I don’t think so.  I will still continue to scribble ideas and words of wisdom that I read.  I cannot imagine abandoning my pens and highlighters in their vibrant colors.

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I enjoy collecting notebooks.  By the way, I am not the only one. I discovered that there are several blogs and podcasts about pens and notebooks.

These are the ones I use to copy the original, practical ideas of creative educators.

I keep a French looking, made in China, notebook that I call ‘Odds and Sods to Share with students.’

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Tomorrow I will tell my ELLs that Harvard is right.  When interacting and annotating text, students should give the ubiquitous highlighter a rest and use pencil to underline and circle.

Research into retrieval strategies that best help students include the flash card.  The highlighter effect on revising is similar to coloring in with a puce-clored Crayola marker.

Got to love Quizlet.

So What?

This is one of the first questions I learnt from reading most of the books Jim Burke published.  Even my ELL students learn this very early on in my courses.

Why have I decided to write a blog about books that I order and push carefully onto my shelf until I can get around to reading them?

Well, it’s all about my professional growth plan for this year.  I now have the chance to read through my unread list of books.

This is where I will comment on the books and lift ideas, strategies etc. that I can use in my class.

Who knows where this will take me.

One thing I know for sure, students will be at the center.

My wonderful ELLs
My wonderful ELLs

To paraphrase J.B. yet again (you’re going to hear a lot about him):

How will these books/blog posts/teaching videos/articles and conversations  help me teach well tomorrow?