It’s Final. I’m Retiring.

It’s hard to own this word.  Retiring.

How about R and R – Reinventing and Retiring?

So for now, I’ll own the word and the reality of  it all.

My friends and colleagues insisted on making me a party so I decided to have it at our local beer and pizza pub/restaurant where we spend many a joyous TGIFs.

I was overwhelmed with the words that were spoken in my honor.  I was speechless – an unusual state for a teacher.  However, I did manage to thank my friends from the bottom of my heart.

 

Nili, our resident poet laureate, read her rhyming, humorous  truths about me – mainly the fact that being a red head is not a color but a character.

Romeo and Juliet – the final unit

I decided to end my final year of teaching with a challenge for me as well as my ELLs.  I hoped Shakespeare’s  play with its eternal themes of relationships would act as a bridge for entering regular English 10.

It was fun.  I taught out of my comfort zone, knowing the students would have to spend most of the time acting.  The students rapped one of Juliet’s soliloquies, mimed cooking , ironing and folding laundry while acting.  They certainly got into the rhythm of the play.

 

Romeo and Juliet – a review before final

I invited Gadi for our second drama workshop to help my ELLs review the big ideas of the play for their final.

Students made a list of their favorite scenes,  got into  groups , rehearsed their scenes using the original text,  and finally acted them out.

The directions were that  when the students acted the scenes in chronological order, they would create a summary of the big ideas of the play.  They had only 20 minutes to prepare.

Gadi asked them one guiding question:

What do the characters want?

 

Using ‘Guernica’ to Promote Visible Thinking and Discussion

As we were finishing Ishmael Beah’s powerful memoir A Long Way Gone; I remembered Picasso’s Guernica.

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So I decided to guide our discussion of one of the final chapters (2nd draft reading (Kelly Gallagher) by using visible thinking prompts in order to analyze the painting:

What do you see, think and wonder?

Students worked in groups as they thoughtfully studied the painting, and responded to each other’s comments.

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This was a different, rich pairing of texts.

My Last PD Books: on Learning and Writing

I plan to teach new material in the final couple of months of my career as an ELL classroom teacher.  To this end I ordered 2 books.

1. So much has been written lately on learning how to learn and how to revise: the myth of the ubiquitous yellow highlighter and simply rereading the texts.  I will present my ELLs as well as my 9th grade Skills class with a compilation of revision suggestions.  In order to create a list of all lists, I have begun reading make it stick: The Science of Successful Learning.

2.  My ELL Writing Workshop includes assignments such as composing a rambling autobiography, a poem to a friend, the perfect focused paragraph,  as well as creating a compelling P.S.A.  I decided that both my students and I need a new challenge – to write an essay.  To help me with this I bought The Journey is Everything – Teaching Essays that Students Want to Write for People who want to Read Them.  I look forward to our journey.

 

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Your One Word and One Sentence

During an ELL Writers’ Workshop, we answered the following questions:

Who are we and what do we believe in?

I followed Larry Ferlazzo’s lesson plan and the results were revealing.

Some students found it frustrating to ‘arrive’ at their word by completing the 3 part Venn diagram.  However, those who persevered were surprised that ‘visible thinking’ helped them identify their word.

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The students then went on to come up with a sentence that encapsulates what they’d like people to say about them.  Once again, I followed Ferlazzo’s lesson design.  Students commented that they are too young, don’t yet know what they want to do, and don’t see themselves as having accomplished much in their lives. After a discussion, gentle prodding and encouragement; they realized that they have passions and beliefs.

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One student came to her ‘ah ha’ moment only after her friends reminded her that, although she is now in 9th grade,  she still regales them with stories from 6th grade. She laughed and willingly agreed to their/her one sentence:

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I find it amusing that her one word is ‘journey’.