Peering Through The Mist of Retirement

I find it hard not to open links to activities for the beginning of the academic year.  I have always searched for new ideas on icebreakers and how to help my diverse students bond into a learning community in Room 463.

However, I always incorporated Jim Burke’s image analysis on what students can expect from the course, which I already posted about  here.

Looking at the image, I thought it was a perfect metaphor for my new status, a word I can barely type – retire

I have so closely identified myself as an educator, specializing in ELL.

What is my     new/renewed identity?

 

My plans for new beginnings are murky, as yet:

There is a need for volunteer teachers.

I have always dreamt of studying history of art.

I have a story line for a children’s book.

I’d like to collate the copious notes that I’ve taken throughout my career as a teacher.

And, of course, to travel off season.

 

I will even need a cane,  since the first thing I have to attend to is a total knee replacement. However, I will get rid of that (the cane) very quickly.

Caspar_David_Friedrich_-_Wanderer_above_the_sea_of_fog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://teachwelltomorrow.com/2016/09/06/3-activities-for-the-begining-of-the-year-setting-the-tone-building-confidence/

My Final Lesson: What’s The Big Idea for Romeo and Juliet?

It was fitting that my final ELL Reading lesson should be taken from What’s the Big Idea by  my long distance mentor, Jim Burke.

I followed Burke’s discussion plan.  We held a lively ‘Conversational Roundtable’ on the relationships in Romeo and Juliet as a review for the final exam.  The students could easily relate to the relationships: parent-child, romantic, friends and mentor-child.  We looked for what rules were common to all the relationships. We discussed  the differences.  However, the harder question was how these relationships shape our identity.  By then the students were getting a little tired, looking forward to their summer break.

I also used question prompts such as:

Does X have a right to …?

Why did Y behave as she/he did?

 

 

 

Romeo and Juliet – the final unit

I decided to end my final year of teaching with a challenge for me as well as my ELLs.  I hoped Shakespeare’s  play with its eternal themes of relationships would act as a bridge for entering regular English 10.

It was fun.  I taught out of my comfort zone, knowing the students would have to spend most of the time acting.  The students rapped one of Juliet’s soliloquies, mimed cooking , ironing and folding laundry while acting.  They certainly got into the rhythm of the play.

 

Romeo and Juliet – a review before final

I invited Gadi for our second drama workshop to help my ELLs review the big ideas of the play for their final.

Students made a list of their favorite scenes,  got into  groups , rehearsed their scenes using the original text,  and finally acted them out.

The directions were that  when the students acted the scenes in chronological order, they would create a summary of the big ideas of the play.  They had only 20 minutes to prepare.

Gadi asked them one guiding question:

What do the characters want?